Things to do in October

October is the last month for the beekeeper to ready his or her bees for the winter. The ivy will be coming to an end soon and the bees need to have enough stores on board to carry them through the winter. As the temperatures begin to fall, they spend more of their time clustered and feeding syrup is no longer an option.  Any hives that are still light could be bolstered with some frames of stores from elsewhere.

A rock on the roof might keep the roof on in a gale but if the stand is toppled the hive will burst asunder and the bees will be exposed to the weather so rope or strap your hives if possible.

They say a mouse has the ability to flatten its head and can pass though any holes bigger than the thickness of a pencil so any entrances thicker than that will need mouseguards. A mouseguard is a strip of metal perforated with bee-sized holes which can be pinned over the entrance to prevent mouse invasions. Mice can destroy a hive of bees in the winter.

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Ivy Honey

Winter is coming but when the temperatures is up – 14 degrees C   or so – the bees will continue to work the ivy (Hedera helix) especially in sunny intervals. It flowers between September and November – even December in  a very mild year. They can take quite a crop from the ivy and it is great fodder for the winter. You will know if your bees are working it because there will be lots of yellow pollen going in which will give the bees a great boost Click here for a pollen load picture or click the photo below for a close up. Standing by the hives the reek of the ivy honey can be very strong. Continue reading Ivy Honey

Honey Ginger Biscuits Recipe

This is the best biscuit recipe I know and it never fails:

Ingredients

  • 4oz self raising flour
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda
  • 1.5oz granulated sugar
  • 2oz butter
  • 1.5 oz honey

Method

  • Preheat oven to 190 deg C or 170 deg fan oven;
  • mix together flour, ginger and bicarbonate of soda;
  • rub in the butter;
  • add sugar and honey;
  • work the honey into the mixture with the back of a spoon, it will take time but keep at it, till you have a stiff paste;
  • form 16 balls and set, well spaced, on greased baking sheets;
  • bake for 11 minutes.

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Hair today…

… gone tomorrow.

Flyaway hair? Try this recipe I found this morning. It takes minutes to prepare and will hold the most stubborn hair in place.

Ingredients

  • 15 grams grated beeswax
  • 4 teaspoons coconut oil

Method

  • melt the beeswax in a glass jar or bowl over a pan of hot water;
  • when melted – add the coconut oil;
  • when that too has melted – stir well and pour into a shallow jar;
  • If you want to add fragrance – cool slightly and stir it in just before bottling.

To use, scrape a little out with a teaspoon – or a fingernail if you’ve got one of those long curved ones. Spread it out over your fingertips then rub it through your mad hair.

PS If you don’t like the consistency you can always melt it down and add more beeswax or coconut or fry an egg in it.

Get it down you – it’ll put hairs on yer chest.

Information For Humans Beeing